Wildlife RescueWildlife Rescue

Our hospital is funded through the generosity of our community. We receive no local, state, or federal funding. If you care enough to rescue an animal, please consider making a small monetary donation to help cover its food and medical care as well.
FOR AN ANIMAL EMERGENCY
PLEASE CALL (856) 983-3329 ext. 106.
DO NOT E-MAIL!

How much does it cost?...to care for the wildlife you bring us:

I have found an injured animal.

If you have found an injured animal, gently capture the animal following the instructions below. Call our wildlife hospital 856-983-3329 ext.106, and then bring the animal to us.

Have a container that will hold the animal ready. A cardboard box or pet carrier lined with a towel or sheet works well.

Wear gloves when catching the animal. Leather gardening gloves or something that will provide protection from a bite or scratch are important. You may be able to coax the animal into a box using a broom or by sliding a flat piece of cardboard or plastic under the animal. All mammals (even babies) can carry rabies, a disease fatal to humans if not treated immediately.

Throw a towel or blanket over the animal. This will help keep the animal calm, and if it’s mobile, will slow the animal down.


Keep the animal in a warm, dark, quiet place and bring it in as soon as possible. Do not attempt to give food or water. Animals can go 24 hours or more without food, even babies. If you cannot get to the refuge immediately, place the box on a heating pad set to low or fill a water bottle with warm water and place it in the box.

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I have found a young animal out of its nest.

If you have found a young animal that has fallen out of its nest
try to reunite the baby with its parents following the instructions below.

Fox KitsAll young animals are better off with their parents, if possible. If reuniting is unsuccessful, then call our wildlife hospital 856-983-3329 ext.106, and bring the animal to us.  Place the animal in a box or pet carrier lined with a towel.  Do not attempt to give food or water. Animals can go 24 hours or more without food, even babies. If you cannot get to the refuge immediately, place the box on a heating pad set to low or fill a water bottle with warm water and place it in the box.

Rabbits

If the young rabbits are the size of a tennis ball (4-5 inches) or bigger and their ears are standing up, they are ready to be on their own. Baby rabbits grow up in about 4 weeks. They are still small when they are on their own, but they can survive.

Baby rabbits only need to come in if they are injured or abandoned. Mother rabbits are away from their nest most of the time. They only come back twice a day, in the morning and evening. Just because you don’t see the mother doesn’t mean she’s not coming back. Even if there was a disturbance, the mother will most likely come back. Place some string in a star-shaped pattern over the nest and wait 12-24 hours. If the string does not look disturbed after this time, the babies are abandoned and need to be brought in.

To keep dogs from disturbing a nest, either keep the dogs inside unless supervised or place a wheelbarrow or box upside down over the nest. Make sure the mother can still slide underneath to get to the nest.

Squirrels

If injured (any blood or cuts, bruises, broken limbs): bring it in.

If not injured: make sure the squirrel is warm and put the squirrel in a basket or container with holes in the bottom and hang in a tree nearby where the squirrel was found (as high as can be reached). Squirrels make multiple nests, so the mother will most likely take the squirrel to new nest. If the mother doesn’t come back after 5-6 hours: bring it in.

Fawns

Fawns are often left alone by their mother for long periods of time. There is only reason to bring a fawn in if:

  • the fawn is injured
  • there is a dead doe near the fawn
  • the fawn is crying a lot
  • the fawn looks emaciated, weak, or disoriented

Unfortunately, we are not equipped to care for adult deer (deer without spots). If you find an injured adult deer, please call your local police department.

Songbirds

If injured (broken limbs, one wing sits differently than the other, blood or cuts): bring it in.

If not injured and not fully-feathered (nestling): put the bird in a basket or container with holes in the bottom and hang in tree nearby where the bird was found. Observe from a distance. If the parents are coming to the makeshift nest: the bird is fine. If no parents come within 3-4 hours: bring it in.

If not injured and fully-feathered (fledgling): place the bird in shrubs/ bushes nearby where it was found. The parents will still come back to check on the bird and feed it. The bird is learning to find food on its own and flying over the next 1-2 weeks.

Ducks and Geese

Ducklings and goslings are almost always with their mother. If babies are found wandering alone, they have probably been separated from the mother and should be brought in. If you can, observe them for a while first, to make sure the mother is not around.

If you have found an animal not listed above, please call our wildlife hospital 856-983-3329 ext. 106 for further instructions.



I have animals in my attic/garage or under a deck/shed.

If you have animals in your attic/garage, or under a deck/shed, follow the instructions below.
To deter animals:
  • Place ammonia soaked rags in the area of activity.
  • Play loud music.
  • Shine bright lights in the area at night.
  • Secure any source of food you may be providing, including bird feeders and trash cans.
  • Limit access by closing off any openings. Before closing the last opening, make sure there are no animals remaining inside.

As early as February, some animals start nesting and having babies. You can encourage the mother to leave on her own by following the above instructions (she will take the babies with her).

Live-trapping and relocating is a last resort. Getting rid of one problem animal doesn’t mean another one won’t just move in and take its place. As a result of habitat loss, wild animals are forced to live closer to humans. There is nowhere else for them to go. If you have caught an animal in a live-trap, look around for babies before relocating.

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Duck Release

Can I keep the wild animal as a pet?

NO, for the following reasons.
  • Keeping a baby for even a short time can result in imprinting (bonding to humans). Imprinted animals can no longer survive on their own in the wild, resulting in a lifetime of dependency on humans.
  • It is illegal in the state of New Jersey to keep wild animals without a permit.
  • It is not fair to the animal. Wild animals will never be "happy” in captivity, will never fully adjust, and will never be like a cat or dog that comes to you for attention.
  • Wild animals are dangerous. Even if they seem friendly as babies, by the time they reach adulthood they will be dangerous and can inflict serious injuries.

There are many domestic animals that need homes and will make great pets. Check local animal shelters to see what’s available for adoption.

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Wildlife Rescue
Wildlife Hospital:
Daily 9am to 7pm


4 Sawmill Road | Medford, NJ 08055
Ph: (856) 983 3329


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Woodford Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge | 4 Sawmill Road | Medford, NJ 08055 | 856-983-3329
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